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Playwright Israel Horovitz On The Problem with Wearing Vintage

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Comedy writer Bonnie Datt once bought a chainmail vest "for clubbing"—a purchase she later came to lament, once she realized that chainmail isn't particularly slimming. Inspired by this, she now spends her spare time asking famous people to dish about purchases which they initially loved—but ended up regretting, for Buyer's Remorse.

This week we inject a dose of culture into our Buyer's Remorse series, and interview legendary playwright and screenwriter, Israel Horovitz. The illustrious seventy-two year old scribe is responsible for "Line," "Park Your Car In Harvard Yard," "Author Author," and more than 70 other produced plays and screenplays. When we first became familiar with Horovitz, back in our teens, we were very excited to learn that he was the father of the Beastie Boys' Ad-Rock. These days, we're more impressed that the French government decorated him as Commandeur dans l'Ordre des Arts et des Lettres.

We asked Israel if he had ever had Buyer's Remorse and we loved his candid response...

Racked: So what have you had Buyer's Remorse about?

Israel Horovitz: For years and years, I've been really loving buying and wearing vintage clothing. I recently bought some shirts from the 1950s, and they're really wonderful, sort of super plaid—you know, larger. Then I got them home and I realized that at my age, when I wear them, it looks like it was my clothing that I never threw away. So I won't be wearing this stuff.
· Israel Horovitz [Official Site]
· All Buyer's Remorse Posts [Racked]