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Mango Follows Zara's Lead in 'Toxic Detox,' Victoria's Secret Still Holding Out

Miranda Kerr in her <strike>Captain Planet outfit</strike> Victoria's Secret Runway show look, via Getty
Miranda Kerr in her Captain Planet outfit Victoria's Secret Runway show look, via Getty

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Good news for the environment: Spanish retailer Mango has just announced they will follow Zara's lead and eliminate all hazardous chemicals from their production process by 2020. Greenpeace's recent "Toxic Threads" report, which was released in November, identified Mango as one of several major sources of toxic pollution in the fashion industry, along with H&M, Zara, Levi's, Victoria's Secret, and others.

"Mango joins Zara, who committed to Detox last week, in beginning to take responsibility for their entire supply chain. This means providing local communities and customers with the information they need to ensure that local water supplies are not turned into industry sewers," said Greenpeace rep John Deans.

Since the publication of "Toxic Threads," Greenpeace has been waging a savvy social media campaign to get more brands to commit to detox by 2020. There have also been media reports that that Australian model Miranda Kerr, who fronts both Mango and Victoria's Secret, will put pressure on those brands to become more environmentally friendly. Kerr is a global ambassador for Earth Hour, an environmental campaign run by the WWF, and owns an organic skincare line called KORA Organics. But those rumors appear to be unfounded: We weren't able to locate any public response from Kerr to the Greenpeace report.
· Zara Commits To 'Toxic Detox' Following Social Media Pressure From Greenpeace [Racked]
· 16 Victoria's Secret Runway Looks in Order of Most to Least Wearable in Real Life [Racked]