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Jennifer Lawrence: Those Who Looked at Leaked Nudes 'Should Cower in Shame'

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Photo: Getty
Photo: Getty

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Jennifer Lawrence has finally spoken about the nude photo leak of August 31, in which members of internet cesspool 4Chan posted naked photos from the personal collection of a series of actresses. Lawrence opened up to Vanity Fair contributing editor Sam Kashner about the incident:

1. On how the photo leak would affect her career: "I was just so afraid. I didn't know how this would affect my career."

"Just because I'm a public figure, just because I'm an actress, does not mean that I asked for this. It does not mean that it comes with the territory. It's my body, and it should be my choice, and the fact that it is not my choice is absolutely disgusting. I can't believe that we even live in that kind of world. "

2. On the proper definition of things and the law: "It is not a scandal. It is a sex crime. It is a sexual violation. It's disgusting. The law needs to be changed, and we need to change. That's why these Web sites are responsible. Just the fact that somebody can be sexually exploited and violated, and the first thought that crosses somebody's mind is to make a profit from it. It's so beyond me. I just can't imagine being that detached from humanity. I can't imagine being that thoughtless and careless and so empty inside."

Photo by Patrick Demarchelier for Vanity Fair

3. On shame: "Anybody who looked at those pictures, you're perpetuating a sexual offense. You should cower with shame. Even people who I know and love say, 'Oh, yeah, I looked at the pictures.' I don't want to get mad, but at the same time I'm thinking, I didn't tell you that you could look at my naked body."

4. On tabloids and the media: "You have a choice. You don't have to be a person who spreads negativity and lies for a living. You can do something good. You can be good. Let's just make that choice and—it feels better."

5. On phone calls no one ever wants to make: "When I have to make that phone call to my dad and tell him what's happened … I don't care how much money I get for The Hunger Games. I promise you, anybody given the choice of that kind of money or having to make a phone call to tell your dad that something like that has happened, it's not worth it. Fortunately, he was playing golf, so he was in a good mood."

6. On finding happiness despite what the FBI does or doesn't discover: "Time does heal, you know. I'm not crying about it anymore. I can't be angry anymore. I can't have my happiness rest on these people being caught, because they might not be. I need to just find my own peace."

The digital edition of the Vanity Fair feature will be available Wednesday, October 8, and the print hits newsstands in New York and Los Angeles on Thursday, October 9.