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New Street Style Movement Doesn't Care About Your Face

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Is this the future of "real" street style? The Guardian just called out a new photography trend on the rise known as "Peep Style" or street style that is as anti-peacock as possible. The underlying message of the movement is, simply, that the more anonymous the street style photo is, the better.

One of the most well-known photographers behind the movement is David Luraschi, although most know him as the "Sartorialist of Sadness." Instead of posting posed street style shots, Luraschi prefers to shoot his subjects from behind to create the most authentic environment possible. A quick scroll through his Instagram feed turns up photo after photo of faceless, seemingly unaware people with their backs turned toward the camera, allowing the viewer only to see the back of each outfit. It's a stark departure from Phil Oh and Tommy Ton's type of style snaps, but Luraschi could be the first of many who start documenting street style in more anonymous ways, if the current backlash against traditional street style photography is anything to go by.

· How street-style photography got real [The Guardian]
· True Confessions Of Street Style Photographers [Racked]
· What It's Really Like to Shoot Street Style at New York Fashion Week [Racked]