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Fashion Police Put on Extended Hiatus

Photo: <a href="https://www.facebook.com/e.fashionpolice/photos/pb.99315534190.-2207520000.1426683768./10152904686989191/?type=3&theater">Fashion Police/</a>Facebook
Photo: Fashion Police/Facebook

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Now that two cohosts have bailed, E! will scrap Fashion Police's remaining scheduled episodes and go on an extended hiatus to recast and reboot the show, according to The Hollywood Reporter. The plan is for Fashion Police to return in September with episodes tied to awards shows and major events. Remaining hosts Giuliana Rancic and Brad Goreski will stick around.

Since it returned without beloved host Joan Rivers, Fashion Police has been plagued by controversy, from pushback over the show's mani-cam to the derogatory comments made by Rancic about singer Zendaya's dreadlocks that cause a media firestorm and seemed to spur the departure of Kelly Osbourne. And while execs weren't surprised by Kathy Griffin's announcement that she was leaving the show, they were caught off guard by her subsequent media tour bashing Fashion Police, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

"With the benefit of hindsight, we definitely brought it back too soon," NBCUniversal Lifestyle Networks Group president Frances Berwick told the magazine. She also said: "To the extent that this has all gotten very intense and serious — it's meant to be fun. When it stops being fun or if we think that we're offending or crossing a line, absolutely, that's the time to re-evaluate and that's what we're doing, frankly, with things like the mani cam."