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Forever 21 Says It's Not Just For Tweens

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Forever 21's style is growing up, according to the Wall Street Journal's Christina Binkley, who spoke with the brand about their efforts to sell clothes to shoppers who aren't tweens. The fast fashion giant has older millennials in its sights now, and Binkley reports that F21 is adding "more forgiving fits and more sophisticated looks." There is the problem of the name, though.

"We’ve been working hard to break down that barrier of age with our brand," Forever 21’s vice president of merchandising Linda Chang told WSJ. "Part of it has to do with overcoming the stigma of our name—Forever 21."

In addition to stocking more grown-up attire, Forever 21 is also adding spendier name brands alongside their $9.90 pencil skirts. Shoppers can now purchase items like $12 Happy Socks and $48 Boy London T-shirts. A big part of the strategy also involves sending clothes to celebs who you wouldn't normally associate with Forever 21. With the help of an agency who works to get Forever 21 clothes into the hands of famous people, so far, Jennifer Lopez has been photographed wearing $25 F21 culottes, Charlize Theron wore a $34.95 jumpsuit, and Mila Kunis wore a F21 striped skirt. Forever 21 then hypes up the celeb sightings on its social media accounts.