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Uniform Dressing Is Sticking Around for Fall

Womenswear brand Tosia is betting on basics.

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A look from Tosia's fall collection Photos: Tosia

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Sage, deep indigo, plum: Tosia's fall collection really couldn't be more fall if it tried. Now in its fourth season, the womenswear brand is betting on well-made basics with tiny twists, like frayed denim, barbell closures, and old-school D-ring belts.

“I love the idea of reinventing the uniform in general, and I wanted to touch on that back-to-school nostalgia while really modernizing and elevating it,” says Tosia designer Sara Hankin. For fall, that nostalgia can also be seen in overalls and A-line skirts: simple uniforms for grown ups.

Tosia fall collection
Tosia fall collection

Prices for this season’s line range from $200 to $300 for tops and $395 to $795 for dresses. While that’s certainly not cheap, Hankin hopes that her shoppers will buy into Tosia with the expectation of hanging onto each piece for a long time. “With our whole brand, I definitely want to keep it season-less, so I don't want to stick with just spring when it's spring. We're not trying to be a fast fashion brand.”

Tosia's fall collection
Tosia's fall collection
Tosia fall collection
Tosia fall collection

Tosia is currently stocked in a mini whos-who of indie retail: Swords-Smith and In Support Of in New York; Plan de Ville online; plus Fred Segal in Tokyo (the collection is also headed to Assembly New York and Los Angeles).

“I think when you're a small brand, you want to partner with stores who are going to really nurture you and really represent your brand,” says Hankin. “It's very much your introduction to your consumer, and the stores that we've partnered with thus far have just been so great about keeping open communication and presenting us as a collection, not just rogue pieces. “

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