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Sears and Kmart Drop Trump’s Home Line

Donald Trump's home line is getting the Ivanka treatment.

Photo: Roberto Machado Noa/Getty Images

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On the heels of Nordstrom, Neiman Marcus, and Belk dropping Ivanka Trump’s fashion line, Sears Holdings, the parent company of Kmart and Sears, is also distancing itself from the administration. Yesterday, a company representative confirmed to ABC that it was removing 31 Trump home products from its website.

"As part of the company's initiative to optimize its online product assortment, we constantly refine that assortment to focus on our most profitable items," a rep from Sears Holdings said in a statement. “Amid that streamlining effort, 31 Trump Home items were among the items removed online this week. Products from the line are still offered online via third-party marketplace vendors. Neither Sears nor Kmart carries the line in brick-and-mortar stores."

The Trump Home line, which is named for Donald and separate from the Ivanka Trump collection, includes lighting, furniture, and bedding (it’s the line that HSN dropped last week). But even after this latest move, Sears remains on the #GrabYourWallet boycott list because it still offers official Trump merchandise via third party providers on its website, like ShopLadder and ApparelSave.

Shannon Coulter, one of organizers of the boycott, says she’s conflicted about keeping Sears on the list, since “a lot of the bigger retailers do offer third party services, and I think it’s a big ask to expect retailers to change the entire way they do business, so we are still discussing it.”

Sears didn’t share numbers on how poorly the Trump Home line was doing online, but based on the dire situation the department store is in — it announced earlier last month it was closing 150 stores — its reluctance to deal with the Trump family business, a PR nightmare at this point, is understandable.